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Mitarbeiter

 

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Lehrstuhlinhaber 

Prof. Dr. Ralf Oelmüller

tele ++49 (0)3641 949231
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232
mail2  b7oera@uni-jena.de

  Büro: R 104

 
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Seketariat 

Carmen Galambos

tele ++49 (0)3641 949230
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232
mail2  b7gaca@uni-jena.de

  Büro: R 105


Sprechzeiten (Open hours):

montags, mittwochs, freitags (Dornburger Str. 159); Tel. 03641 949230

dienstags, donnerstags (Am Planetarium 1); Tel. 03641 949200


Wissenschaftliche MitarbeiterInnen


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PD Dr. Klaus-Jürgen Appenroth


tele ++49 (0)3641 949233
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232
mail2  Klaus.Appenroth@uni-jena.de

  Büro: R 320

 


seit Februar 2014 im Ruhestand
since February 2014 retired

Leiter der Internationalen Kommission  zur Förderung von Wasserlinsen-Forschung und -Anwendung
Head of the International Steering Committee on Duckweed Research and Application


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Dr. George Ochieng Asudi

tele  ++49 (0)3641 949237
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232  
mail2  

   Büro: R 120

 


My research focuses on 'Detection of host genes and metabolites in response to infection of Napier grass by Napier grass stunt (NGS) phytoplasma’ with the main aim of developing a management strategy for the NGS disease in East Africa. The proposed study will use mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and digital gene expression analysis based on the next generation sequencing to provide comprehensive information on the genome-wide gene expression changes in Napier grass after NGS-phytoplasma infection. The study will also disclose biological processes related to development of disease symptoms, phytoplasma survival and give insights into the molecular mechanism behind the interaction between Napier grass and NGS-phytoplasma. Metabolites are the products of gene expression (Ward et al. 2007) hence, analysis of changes in metabolic quantity and quality will help reveal the features of Napier grass interactions with NGS-phytoplasma and the responses of plant to environmental changes. The proposed study will deepen our understanding in the mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of NGS-phytoplasma and will help to identify key genes, which could be used for NGS-resistance breeding of Napier grass. Understanding the responses of host plants to phytoplasma infection is also very important for developing efficient methods to control NGS-phytoplasma disease. 

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Dr. Alexandra C. U. Furch

tele ++49 (0)3641 949234
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232
mail2  Alexandra.Furch@uni-jena.de

  Büro: R 106

Higher plants are characterized by the vascular system. The vascular system is a network throughout the whole plant body. It is composed of two long-distance transport systems for substrate supply, the xylem and the phloem. The conductive elements are in xylem the xylem vessels or tracheids (conduct mainly water) and in phloem the sieve elements (conduct mainly photoassimilates).  Both long-distance systems are also responsible for transport of proteins, phytohormones, RNA, and other compounds that mediate signalling, growth, development and defence.

Despite of the importance of the vascular system, the significance for numerous various physiological processes is still not well understood.

Research Topics:

I) Mechanism of wound occlusion
II) Role
of Ca2+ as intracellular second messenger for physiological responses
III) Role of xylem and phloem for defence responses

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Dr. Jeannette Pfalz


tele ++49 (0)3641 949236
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232          
mail2  Jeannette.Pfalz@uni-jena.de

  Büro: R 119


Chloroplasts are remarkably dynamic organelles that enable plants to convert light energy to chemical energy. The primary focus is to understand the molecular mechanisms and dynamic of chloroplast biogenesis. In particular, we are interested in understanding the concerted action of the nuclear and plastidal genetic systems, both highly modulated by environmental stimuli. Central question are: What components contribute to chloroplast maturation or plastid differentiation? Which genes mediate plastid and nuclear gene expression? What is the function of the encoded gene products? How do their environmental signaling interactions control chloroplast maturation or differentiation? To address these issues, we use a wide range of biochemical tools and available genetic resources.


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Dr. Sandra Scholz 

tele ++49 (0)3641 949203
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232   
mail2 s.scholz@uni-jena.de

   Büro: R 103.3

 

 

 


Throughout their life, plants are challenged by various abiotic and biotic changes in their environment. Any appropriate reaction to such environmental variations needs the recognition of the respective information, which is encoded in a cytosolic calcium elevation, followed by induction of downstream intracellular signaling. The defense against herbivorous insects and pathogens is costly for the plant and results in decreased growth.

Research Topics:

I) Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana colonization by the pathogen Verticillium dahliae through RNAseq (e.g. regulation of Ca2+-dependent proteins or different sugar transporters), SFB project
II) Analysis of defense induction in Arabidopsis thaliana after JA-Ile macrolactone treatment, where the growth of plants is not reduced
III) Identification and characterization of mutants in wounding-induced systemic Ca2+-signaling (with PhD student Anja Meents).


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Dr. Irena Sherameti

tele ++49 (0)3641 949203
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232         
mail2  Irena.Sherameti@uni-jena.de

  Büro: R 103.3


Together with the PhD student Khabat Vahabi I am working on the project "Piriformospora indica-induces changes in the Arabidopsis root transcriptome". To study this we established a short and a long term co-cultivation system between the beneficial fungus Piriformospora indica and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Based on DNA microarray technology we use wild type and different Arabidopsis mutants to study gene expression profiling of roots, before (short-term) and after (long-term) the interaction plant-fungus is established.

 

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Dr. Matthias Zimmermann


tele
 ++49 (0)3641 949234
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232         
mail2  Matthias.R.Zimmermann@bot1.bio.uni-giessen.de

  Büro: R 106 

Perception of microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMPs) by eukaryotic cells leads to a variety of local responses (including membrane depolarization and an increase in cytosolic Ca2+) and to the systemic spread of signals via the phloem. Several long-distance signals, such as diverse RNA-species, proteins, nitric oxide, azelaic acid, SFD1/GLY1-derived glycerol-3-phosphate, dehydroabietinal, phytohormones (e.g. methylated salicylic acid, jasmonates), as well as electrical signals, have been proposed to play integral roles in activating systemic resistance responses in plants. However, neither the signalling mechanisms through which systemic defences are activated - possibly a mixture of processes -, nor the precise involvement of the vascular system in translocation and/or amplification of these signals has been elucidated. Based on previous findings (e.g. Zimmermann et al. 2007, 2009, 2013 and Furch et al. 2007, 2009, 2010, 2014) it is to hypothesize that occlusion of sieve elements results in a nutrient reallocation, and distal plant parts become temporarily isolated. Moreover, the spread of pathogens and/or their effectors throughout the whole plant would be temporarily disrupted and signal and defence molecules would be enriched. More generally, fundamental knowledge on phloem signaling could be of high value for biotechnological strategies in plant protection.
 

DoktorandenInnen


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Ute Holtzegel

tele ++49 (0)3641 949245
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232
mail2  Ute.Holtzegel@uni-jena.de

  Büro: R 121


Plants use big pigment-binding protein aggregates, so called light-harvesting complexes, to optimise light collection for photosynthesis. In my work, I investigate the expression of the gene family coding for the the light-harvesting complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana. I examine how members of the phytochrome photoreceptor family influence the amount of mRNA for these genes in different red light conditions, and try to connect the diversity of expression patterns with the evolutionary history of the gene family.

 
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Anja Meents

tele  ++49 (0)3641 571262
faxsymbol ++
49 (0)3641 949232

mail2  ameents@ice.mpg.de

Research Topics:

 I) Isolation and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants impaired in systemic wound signaling
II) Analysis of systemic Calcium elevation in Arabidopsis thaliana in interaction with Piriformospora indica and Alternaria brassicae
III) Investigation of volatile-mediated cytosolic Calcium signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana

 


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Maria Paulmann

tele++49 (0)3641 949234
      ++49 (0)3641 571319
Faxsymbol++49 (0)3641 949232      
mail2 mpaulmann@ice.mpg.de

 Büro: R 106


Plants have evolved striking defenses to protect themselves from aphid attack, some of which are investigated in our group. The first steps of this work will investigate general defense mechanisms that induce reactions in the phloem or that are located here. We plan to investigate the configuration of forisomes and the oxidative state in different pea aphid biotype – legume species combinations to understand their role in mediating aphid host-race evolution. Forisomes are large protein bodies situated in the sieve elements of legumes that reversibly block the phloem-mass flow by dispersing. The dispersion of forisomes is triggered via a Ca2+-influx which can induce and can in turn be induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS accumulate when pea aphids puncture the sieve elements and other cells upon feeding. 
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Johannes Thürich

tele
 ++49 (0)3641 949249
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232
mail2  johannes.thuerich@uni-jena.de

Büro: R 201


The goal of my project is to study the interaction of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana attenuata with root-colonizing fungi. These fungi, i.e. Piriformospora indica, Mortierella hyalina, Alternaria brassicae and Verticillium dahliae, exudate compounds which induce rapid cytosolic calcium elevation in roots. The Ca2+ signal is important for the downstream responses of plants such as gene activation or release of antifungal compounds. I will identify and characterize these unknown biomolecules and there in planta counterpart.

Calcium measurement, next generation sequencing, mass spectrometry, gene expression studies and bio assays will help me to get new insights into the plant-microbial signaling.

 

 


Masterstudenten

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Sedef Özyürek

tele
++49 (0)3641 949249
faxsymbol
++49 (0)3641 949232
mail2

Büro: R 201

Phytohormones, especially auxin, are key regulators of developmental processes throughout the life cycle of a plant. I am studying the interaction of beneficial (Piriformospora indica; Mortierella hyalina) as well as pathogenic fungi (Alternaria brassicicola; Verticillium dahliae) with the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The main focus of the project is monitoring the auxin maxima in roots after plant-fungi co-cultivation.

Research Topic

1. Analysis of Fungal–induced formation of auxin maxima in Arabidopsis roots

 

 

Technische MitarbeiterInnen

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Anna-Sophie Enke

tele++49 (0)3641 949238
faxsymbol++49 (0)3641 949232
mail2

Sample preparation and measurement at high resolution photon counting camera system (HRPCS) for Arabidopsis.

 EMS mutagenesis and screen of resulting mutant populations.

 

 

 

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Sarah Mußbach

tele++49 (0)3641 949238
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232
mail2  Sarah.Mussbach@uni-jena.de

  Labor: R 110

Microarray preparation: WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana under phosphate stress conditions with/without Piriformospora indica interaction.

Mutations in abscisic acid mediated signaling pathway.

 
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Claudia Röppischer  - (maternity leave) -

tele++49 (0)3641 949238
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232
mail2 c.roeppischer@uni-jena.de

  Labor: R 110

 

Competition between Piriformospora indica (beneficial fungus) and Verticilium dahlie (pathogenic fungus) in dual culture experiment.

Cytosolic Calcium elevation in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

 

 
Bild.Elke Elke Woker

tele
++49 (0)3641 949238
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232
mail2 

   Labor: R 110
 
     
Foto.Uli Ulrich Weber

tele
 0173 5895408
Faxsymbol ++49 (0)3641 949232
mail2 Ulrich.A.Weber@uni-jena.de

   Büro: R 101.2
 Caretaker Dornburger Str. 159